We See You—Words of Encouragement from One Parent to Another

November 2020 | Question of the Month
Image
girls with flowers huging

It’s safe to assume most of us have been there—we’ve been overwhelmed and heartbroken by a new diagnosis or perplexing medical/developmental issues with no answers for our child. When asked what you would say to a parent in that situation, I bet you went back there. The sights, the smells, the sounds, the feelings of it all probably came rushing back. And maybe you’re still there. Still grappling with a diagnosis. Still grieving. Still adjusting.

Initially, I envisioned this month’s question to be a resource for parents just starting this journey, and a way for the rest of us to reflect on how far we’ve come.

And yet, as I read through the answers, I realized these were much-needed pep talks for me, now. We all need these words of encouragement. Always. We all need reminders of our strength and capacity to handle what we’re given. We need reminders that we’re not alone.

A big thanks to all parents who contributed to this pick-me-up for parents of all stages of the journey. Enjoy!

"You’ve got this! I’m here for support!"

—@hey.its.alyssaa

"Breathe."

—@allaboutaudiologypodcast

"You are not alone!"

—@lifewith.ourangel

"You are not alone, this is not your fault, and there is always hope. Let others help you <3"

—@brianna.alcox

"All your feelings are valid. Find your people. You’re stronger than you realize."

—@libby.525

"Don’t give up hope. Your child is so much more than this diagnosis! They are valuable and unique. Try to find support. Don’t trust everything you see online. Look for people who have gone through the same thing. You are not alone."

—@shortandsweet.pnw

"Your child is perfect. They are the same person as they were before you got the diagnosis. Your child didn't change with receiving the diagnosis. Your child doesn't need to be fixed, but needs to be connected with as a person. The diagnosis is not a sentence or an absolute dictation of their outcome, but gives you a guide to know better how to help them reach their full potential. The diagnosis does not define them as a person they define themself as a person. Helping them is not about immersing them in tons of therapies, but connecting with them and exposing them to all the normal real life things. A child no matter what their diagnosis or intelligence test score is an amazingly smart and wonderfully beautiful learning being."

—Jamie S.